Stories

NOTE:  Get Help Get Active’s policy is that we keep all client information completely confidential.   The stories that appear here are only posted after a client has offered to allow his or her experiences to be shared on the website.  All personal identifying information (names, places and specific dates) have been removed.

These links tell our personal stories.  We are individuals who have struggled with laziness in our lives.  Each of us have been able to connect with an encouraging friend in order to help us to move towards our own picture of what constitutes a healthy and normal level of self-exertion.

Our purpose in sharing these stories is to let people know that laziness is real.  Although we are not trained in medicine or psychology, we believe, based on our personal experience, that there is a sense in which our own laziness exists independently of any physical or mental illness.

Of course, there are many physical and mental sicknesses which have the symptoms of weakness and/or low productivity.  It is an unfortunate coincidence that laziness has very similar symptoms because that can make it difficult for an individual to distinguish the root issue in his or her own life.  This is particularly true when someone is suffering from a mental or physical illness and, simultaneously, affected by laziness.  Many of us have been (or are now) in that situation.

Others of us have not been victims of any physical or mental illness – at least none to speak of.  We are just plain lazy.

We hope that, by telling our stories, we can help to remove some of the stigma that surrounds laziness so that more people would be willing to seek treatment from the debilitation that it causes.  Our thinking is that our laziness is a symptom of a disease of the mind and the spirit.  It seems to be caused by a combination of false beliefs and an inclination towards a type of moral weakness – and maybe a kind of immaturity, too.  In any case, in this sense, we believe that laziness is a symptom of a disease that is just as real as any of the other “regular” diseases.

Personal Stories 

1)  Debilitated by intermittent laziness for his entire adult life.  Occasionally productive and focused.   A history of substance abuse.  Money as an enabler.  In and out of college many times.  Symptoms of mental illness.  Wondering where to draw the line between pain due to mental illness vs pain due to foolish choices?  Social consequences.  Some lost opportunities.  Several long  stretches of unemployment and not looking for work. Finally becoming successful in a career.  Taking an early “retirement.”  Is it retirement or just another long stretch of discouraging inactivity?  Working with an accountability partner.  Read the full story [here].

2)  Coming soon …

3)  Coming soon …

3 Responses to Stories

  1. MVNJ says:

    I think my paragraph would say rebellious adolescent. Hopeless addict. Loss of high school sweetheart. Mental illness destroying dreams. A life long battle with addiction and mental illness. Finally getting the solution. On the road to health. For myself laziness does exist. Certain people have more challenges to get motivated than others do. I think that even if my mental illness and drug addiction were cured, that I would still have a predisposition to laziness. I have in the past felt like I could do more than I was doing. Its not so much that I regret that I didn’t do things – there has been a healing in my life – so it is easier for me to exert myself – so no a days I dont feel like I am a lazy person – I am just cautious about what I get involved in – bcz I realize that there are things that I cannot accomplish – so I dont want to get too hung up on not being number one. I am trying to steer away from all or nothing thinking.

  2. Anonymous says:

    The difference between fear and sloth. Fear or sloth or both?

  3. hypocritical says:

    This part was funny! -> “Others of us have not been victims of any physical or mental illness – at least none to speak of. We are just plain lazy.

    We hope that, by telling our stories, we can help to remove some of the stigma that surrounds laziness so that more people would be willing to seek treatment from the debilitation that it causes.”

    I mean, shouldnt there **be** stigma about laziness?!!

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